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and the u.s. maritime alliance are close to finalizing a new labor deal. so close, that they've extended the deadline on negotiations by another 30 days. this heads off a strike that could have begun on sunday, crippling 14 important ports. the possibility of a strike worried retailers, manufacturers, and farmers, and risked losses in the billions. >> susie: our next guest says once the fiscal cliff mess is resolved, there will be an explosion of mergers and acquisitions in 2013. he's robert profusek, chairman of the global m&a practice at jones day. so bob why you are so up beat about more mergers and being a acquisitions especially with everything going on with the fiscal cliff. >> it's a pessimistic time andtn the merger market. m & a has been fantastic. 9 market has been okay. it's not been at th terrible bus been good. it's been held back by the negativism that was focused on the eu and this year it's the fiscal cliff and the election and everything else. the conditions are there. we need more m. & a in this cup. >> you are saying they are notgt ablocksblockbustermega deals buo medi
will wait until tuesday. that means the u.s. could go over the fiscal cliff. on wall street today, investors bought up stocks on high hopes of deal, after president obama said this afternoon a deal is "in sight," and positive comments from republican leaders in the senate. here's how e major averagesr closed on this last trading day of 2012. the dow surged 166 points, the nasdaq jumped about 60, and the s&p rose almost 24 points. while wall street has already closed the books on 2012, washington still has a few hours to go before its new year's day fiscal cliff deadline. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: after a weekend of late-night negotiations with the vice presidt, senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said an agreement on the fiscal cliff was very, very close. >> we'll continue to work on finding smarter ways to cut spending, but let's not let that hold up protecting americans from the tax hike that will take place in about 10 hours. >> reporter: the deal would raise the top tax rate for individuals making more than $400,000 and couples with more than $450,000 in income. item
to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: how about that? it is called detroit, a grinning when the -- a grammy-winning jazz artists. he worked with the late great miles davis. in just a bit, another special performance. marcus miller, i am delighted to see you. >> i know exactly what you mean. tavis: the last time we talked was on my radio program, and you took off to go to europe. i am at my house on line and a headline pops up that says marcus miller in fatal switzerland bus crash. i am at my house, and i screamed. i had just talked to you, i had seen you days prior. i could not believe you had died in a bus crash. the driver of the bus did die. what was going on in switzerland. >> we had just finished and monte carlo, the jazz festival. at the show, we had a long trek to holland. that is about 3:00, 4:00 in the morning. i am starting to come up, and i feel like it is vertigo. the impact causes the bus to fall on its side. from all the people here, crashing into people,
next year is likely to be a bit better next year here in the u.s. and globally. >> susie: we saw that treasury yields rose, and is this a signal to get out of treasures and to put your money into stocks? this has been a safety area for most investors. >> it sure is. i bought a bond and it went up, and why do you want to take this away from me. but i believe in the premises of your question. if, in fact, the economy is a little better, and the financial risks are a little better, that's a recipe for very low interest rates, for a mild increase in interest rates, which means bond prices go down. i would not be overweight in the treasury area. i would have modest weights and have the rest made up in equity, susie. >> susie: bob, thanks a lot. we look forward to your 10 predictions in 2013. we'll be talking to you about that. robert doll as nuveen as asset management >> susie: there was a new twist today in the samsung-apple saga over patent disputes. samsung electronics dropped a critical lawsuit banning the sale of apple products in europe. the good news helped put some shine on ap
will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again.at but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq fromains.. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual rate of 2.9% from july through september. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller t
victory investment. apple didn't say where in the u.s. the line of mac computers would be built or how many jobs might be included. now the return of apple to u.s. manufacturing comes as shareholders have experienced a very rocky ride in the past few months. the stock is down 22% from its all-time high in september. suzanne pratt reports. rtses. >> reporter: a peak inside this manhattan apple store and it looks like everything is a-okay. plenty of customer, plenty of purchases. so why has the shine come off apple's shares? with a-- in a word, actually two, profit-taking. >> i think the biggest reason for the selling going back to when it was priced $700 in september is pure profit-taking. if you look from the beginning year to september, the stock was up 74%. so i think you had some natural profit-taking. >> reporter: but this isn't ode year-end selling by institutions looking to record nice numbers. this supposedly is fiscal cliff related selling as shareholders worries that capital gains tax rates will be higher next year. >> still, financial planner sharon appleman says selli
remains endemic. toyota will pay a record u.s. fine of $17.4 million for failing to report auto defects quickly and delaying a recall. it's the company's fourth safety-related fine in the past two years. this one involved floor mats that could hold down the gas pedal in some 2010 lexus models. toyota did not admit to any legal violations. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the community continues to mourn its losses in connecticut, resume some routine and consider its own role in a national conversation on what steps should now be taken. ray suarez begins our coverage with this report. >> suarez: a hearse arrived this morning at saint rose of lima catholic church in newtown carrying the body of six-year-old james mattioli, one of the slain first graders from sandy hook elementary school. hours later, a church bell tolled as mourners greeted another small white casket at the funeral for jessica rekos, also six. (bell tolling). meanwhile, students from other local schools returned to class. in buses adorned with ribbons bearing sandy hook's colors,
to close at 1,374. the nasdaq rose 15 points to close at 2,989. the u.s. senate has overwhelmingly approved a bill normalizing trade relations with russia. but the measure also contained provisions to punish russian officials accused of human rights offenses-- a move the russian government has denounced. the house passed the legislation last month. president obama has pledged to sign it into law. it was all smiles today for the duchess of cambridge, as she left a london hospital. the former kate middleton was discharged after being treated for severe morning sickness. the duchess emerged with her husband, prince william, three days after being admitted. the hospital stay prompted royal officials to announce her pregnancy to the public. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and to egypt. within the last 24 hours the country has seen the worst violence since president mohamed morsi was elected in june. seven people were killed and more than 600 hurt during overnight clashes in cairo outside the presidential palace. we have a report from jonathan rugman of "in
holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving fla
. they have been doing well worldwide, particularly in the u.k. and the u.s. from the york, we have this report. >> a trend, old people in the movies. next month, a movie set at a retirement home story musicians and several british actors. tommy lee jones succeeded this year in "i hope springs" been called a midlife romantic comedy. and then there was the marigold hotel, the story of a british retiree at a hotel in india that has been very profitable, costing $10 million to make, taking in $140 million around the world. the film cast is unusual because of many of its older characters. >> they are taking charge. >> the new wave of films is being welcomed. and everything is geared towards the youth, and to see people my age makes me feel good on film, like we are not forgotten. >> liam neeson is flourishing as an action star at the age of 60, maintaining that older people have been underserved by hollywood. >> they're making movies for 15- year-old up to 25-year-olds. >> studios maintain that older people figure into their calculations. >> older audiences are avid moviegoers, they gre
of around 200 jobs throughout the u.s. they all stopped selling the modern sporting rifles, as they're called. changes the law might be more difficult. >> there is no chance of a ban on handguns. the supreme court has ruled plans to outlaw them in chicago and washington d.c. are unconstitutional. the most likely move would be to ban military-style assault rifles, magazines holding numerous bullet. the president has backed such a bill. >> while he supports strongly an assault weapons ban and other measures, he wants to expand the conversation beyond those specific areas of legislation. >> i'm joe manchin -- >> the group of the gun hand -- of the gun ban will be loosened a little. even west virginia senator joe manchin, whose campaign had focused on gun rights, has changed his mind. he is not alone kerpen >> when my daughters ask me on friday night, dad, you are in the senate, why can't we put reasonable restrictions on assault weapons or rapid-fire ammunition clips, i did not have a good answer for them. enough is enough. >> america is in a reflective mood, which may not last. weapon
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: always pleased to welcome anne lamott to the program. her latest project is called, i love this, "help, thanks, wow: the three essential prayers." i love the title. i love the book. i love the packaging. i love the layout. >> thank you. tavis: it packs a powerful punch. how're people responding to a run the country? >> great, but i brought to a little something, a present for you when your mother. i brought a present. this is for you. this is a cross that the children at st. andrew's presbyterian made. that is the star of bethlehem and the chute of jesse. we bake them in the oven. this is the burleigh one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. -- the girly one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. tavis: my mother watches this show every night. >> where did you put that across? tavis: i will bring it home for christmas, mom. ♪ i'll be home for christmas ♪ >> get over-excited. tavis: i do that. i want to get right into this. i
many. >> today in brussels, the u.s. secretary of state delivered a clear message, warning nato allies they must honor their financial commitments to afghanistan security forces after western troops pull back in 2014. after more than a decade of war, the country's still fragile. but afghanistan has been in this situation before. in a new book, the author, an afghan native, he writes about the misunderstood a history of the country and what it suggests for the country prepare -- for the country's future prepar. >> what i want to say is that it is not a case of the afghan people are one group and the taliban as another entity over there. they have been engaged in a long struggle between its own tendencies toward wanting to open up to the world and move the country in that direction, and those forces that want to entrench and reject that role and become more locally world. you know, verify and confirm the power of grass-roots clerics, grass-roots elders, that is the tendency in afghanistan. it is true that is very much associated with islamic, what we would call, conservatism. >> is that
among latino catholics. the u.s. catholic bishops waged an active campaign against the obama administration's decision to require employers, including many faith-based employers, to provide free coverage of contraceptive services. the bishops said that would be a violation of religious freedom. the administration tried to offer a compromise, but the bishops, joined by many evangelical groups, said the compromise didn't go far enough. several religious institutions filed legal challenges to the policy. this summer, the bishops organized what they called a "fortnight for freedom" to highlight their concerns. faith-based groups continued to be divided over economic issues. conservative activists supported massive cuts to the federal budget, arguing that it's immoral to leave debt to future generations. but a broad-based interfaith coalition argued that it was immoral to make cuts that would hurt the poor. to underscore that point, a group of catholic sisters organized a project called "nuns on the bus," where they crisscrossed the country speaking out against the federal budget
from the national association of business economics. the organization figures the u.s. economy will grow 2.1%, driven by housing and construction, but with corporati profit growth slowing down. nayantara hensel is the chairman of the national association for business economics. not bad, moderate, stable but certainly not robust here s it? >> no, that's absolutely right, tom. basically again we're forecasting annual average real gdp growth at 2.1% but the good news is we expect it to accelerate during the course of the year, perhaps reach being 3% by the fourth quarter of 2014. >> tom: what is going to add to that growth considering, is it being held back in the first six months because of the uncertainty over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. in fact, if you take a look at the panelist forecast on a quarterly basis they suggest real gdp growth will be 1.8% in the first quarter of 2013 but will jump by the second quarter of 2013 to about 2.4%. i think some of that is definitely being held back by a lot of the concerns that resolution is important of the tax and the spending plans
of the u.s. and global economy, all eyes remain on efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff deadline on january 1st, when automatic spending cuts and tax increases are set to take hold. there is growing optimism on capitol hill that a deal could come soon, yesterday president obama said he would be willing to lower his revenue goal and tax increases at 400,000 instead of 250,000 per household. >> john boehner said he developed a backup plan to avert year-end tax increases if the negotiations with president obama stalls, this occurs in the backdrop of an economic that is bettering on housing and employment data, the global economy continues fragile with the european debt crisis and china i in in. >> rogoff is a professor of public policy and economics at harvard, he is a coauthor of the best selling book, this time is different, eight centuries of financial folly, many consider it to be the authoritativeext on the impact of financial crisis around the world. i am pleased to have ken rogoff back on this program. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: let me start big, if i may. so i mean, how do
of the egyptian pound. the u.s. secretary of state, hillary clinton, is being treated for a blood clot in a vain between her brain and skull. doctors caring for say she should make a full recovery. earlier this month, the veteran politician suffered a concussion after fainting and falling down. >> hillary clinton in belfast earlier this month, the end of a typically frenetic a foreign trip, for countries in five days. is thought to contracted a stomach virus. at home, she fell and suffered a concussion. she's now being treated at this new york hospital and has been told to avoid this sort of punishing travelled has taken her to more foreign capitals than any of her predecessors. 112 on countries and more than a million miles. hillary clinton is popular home. she's one of the most trusted members of president obama's cabinet. she missed at least one important domestic in nature and since falling ill -- a congressional hearing to answer questions about the attacked in an gussie. -- attack in benghazi. it is not clear whether she has plans to return next month. it's hardly the conclusion -- this hi
have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome richard gere to this program. the talented actor and tireless human rights advocate stars in a new film out now called "arbitrage." the movie is the story of a troubled hedge fund manager and also stars susan sarandon and tim roth, so here now a scene from "arbitrage." >> everybody wins, if we sell the company. if i live for you. >> you don't have to live. you didn't know about it. that is why didn't tell you. >> that will take away my brokerage license. delmar to supervisor chu. my name in every paper. -- failure to supervise you. >> because it is my job. >> it is illegal, and i am your partner. >> you are not my partner. you work for me. that's right, you work for me. everybody works for me. tavis: i have been so anxious to talk to you. thank you for coming. >> no, it's a great pleasure. tavis: oh, we've done some radio before, but never on television. >> we
of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: a car bomb exploded outside a compound used by a u.s. construction company in kabul, afghanistan, today. the firm builds facilities for the u.s. military. two afghan workers were killed, and more than a dozen others were wounded. the taliban claimed responsibility. and in the east, villagers held funerals for nine young girls who died in an explosion in nangarhar province. police said they may have triggered a land mine left over from the time of the soviet invasion. meanwhile, in northwest pakistan, a car bomb in a crowded market killed 17 people and wounded more than 40. the blast left a scene of scorched wreckage. in syria, the vice president now is warning that neither side will win the battle for control of the country. farouk al-sharaa is a longtime ally of president bashar al- assad's family. in an interview, he called for a national unity government with "broad powers." meanwhile, the violence raged on. rebel fighters claimed they captured an army infantry college near the northern city of aleppo. president obama and house speak
, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wake of the financial crisis. the 11,000 employees to be laid off worldwide, aake upe bout 4% of the company's workforce. more than 6,000 of those jobs are in consum
the heat of the debate, to election night, the political divide wydened. the u.s. re-examined its role abroad and a second term president claimed it. we look ahead to what happens next with michael duffy of "time" magazine. john harwood of cnbc and the "new york times." doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times" and karen tumulty of "the washington post." >> covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital. this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate fuppeding for "washington week" is provided by -- -- corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern, one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here, to chart a greern path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harn es -- harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> the people of boeing are looking to tomorrow to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by -- pru
of the funerals of the 26 people killed in america's deadliest school shootings. in response, the u.s. lawmakers about action. tipping point?he >> this is an outrage. we are killing each other. we are the only industrialized country in the world of doing it. to >> at least nine afghan girls are killed by a landmine while collecting firewood. it raises questions about these weapons of war. >> welcome to this special edition of "bbc world news america." this community is warning the loss of 26 people including 20 children killed in a school on friday. it has ignited a debate about gun control in america. today was about the children, i got little noah and little jack pinto, to six girls who were buried today. it should a community struggling with grief and with shock. we have the latest. >> the agony of this week town was almost unbearable. first jack pinto was also buried. the town will hold the funerals of 80 more small victims of horrific violence. the parents of one of them have been speaking of their desperation as they waited outside the school on friday. >> i know exactly what she was weari
also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the information minister and he repeated one of their official positions, which is that they say they
in the u.s. -- gun ownership and australia was 5% of households. hear, gallup has shown is 47%. we have a second amendment and the whole history going back to washington. given that we are a different culture, the kinds along that we pass are almost always an effective as a result because there are 300 million weapons out there today. unless you recall them the way australia did and when we can not you will have a reservoir that will last for 100 years. >> you try that in this country, you can imagine. >> you will have an insurrection. >> the dilemma of gun-control. you do not need to permit guns -- and i understand there are already plenty of them. he did not simply not do something because it is already a problem. right now, we allowed guns that are made specifically to injured in the most grievous way, and the fastest way. they are military weapons. we do have to keep permitting those on our streets. they do not kill deer because the deer would be so torn up you would not eat them. this makes no sense at all. but it does not make any sense either to allow people on the street who nee
. it will be out very soon in the u.s. they will make a presentation. but i'm very much looking forward to finish this project. and we have best russians and best what you call western voices, among them reneee poppin or-- kaufman or nina, of course major, major names which are known as wagner singers. but also fantastic russian voices. i think it makes it all together a very interesting combination. >> is there something that would represent your great cowhering ambition and achievement in muss smick? i mean you have you're a builder beyond a conducter. you do all these things. you now celebrate what the 25th anniversary. >> 25th at marinski. >> as my music directorship, 25, artistic directorship which is a good distance it is not a small distance. >> and i saw soviet union falling apart. i saw russia being totally young country trying to build democracy but also trying to save whatever national wealth was there. it was very difficult to understand. was it just gas, oil, was it rivers and forests, was it a vast, vast country, huge territory but also culture. i represent maybe not such a group of
. >> rose: had him in your sight and he slips away. >> and the story of u.s. special forces working with local afghan warriors in the culture clash there. so that was the idea. and then things changed. >> rose: things changed meaning what happened. but take back before the fact. you were working on the movie before the may operation. >> yes. we were, i was actually casting, i was auditioning actors. we had a scout in kazakhstan and we had a trip in order to see the area in which i would be replicating in kazakhstan and history intervened. >> rose: what intrigued you about this story. why is it so intriguing of all the options you had coming off the great success of hurt locker? >> well i think both of us thought this was potentially certainly a fascinating story. maybe the world's greatest man hunt. and no question perhaps the world's most dangerous man. >> rose: pretty good element. >> pretty good element. >> rose: and intense interest in this from around the world. >> exactly. >> but i think we were both curious just as americans or as citizens, what have you, what was going o
. but it's also very common in civilian life so in the u.s. general population, estimates of similar around 2 to 3% of people have post traumatic stress disorder in their lifetime. some people are more likely to develop ptsd because of their occupations. a lot of post traumatic stress disorder in firefighters, in policemen and women. and then as eric also mentioned, more ptsd in the general population in women than in men in large part because of the kinds of traumatic experiences women are often exposed to, domestic violence, sexual trauma and the like. >> rose: is the core here the fear, whether it's from war or from civilian life, the idea of the constant fear of being assaulted? >> so the core is really that something life threatening has happened to profoundly change the individual's view of the world and their expectations. and a big part of it then is this ongoing fear that it could recur, it could happen again, it's going to come back opinions when did you first notice it, john. when did you become aware that what you had been experiencing might be something not-- what everybody exp
. >> and the last time the fcc tried to do this, the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rdrd circui ordered the commission to hold up, that it should first evaluate the impact of any rule changes on the ownership by females and minority. what impact do you think this new rule would have on minority and women in the media? >> well, the truth is that right now, in terms of minorities and women, there is relatively, an embarrassing little amount of ownership. no one doubts that if you move to a situation where corporate america, the big guys, own more and more of the media, it will mean that minorities and women and those folks who don't have big bucks are going to be squeezed even further to the periphery. so it will be bad for minorities. it will be bad for women. and most significantly, it will be bad for american democracy. >> some people argue that newspapers are failing anyway. that they're going under, losing advertising, cutting their staffs, losing their readership. and that it would be a good thing for these big, profitable corporations like ge and murdoch's news corporation to take
, the harvard economics professor weighs in on the fiscal cliff negotiations and the u.s. and global economy. in 2013. >> i am fascinated to watch what is happening in europe, where right now europe is quiet and all the action is in the united states, my european friends policy friends are thrilled that they are not on tv in the united states, that everybody is worried about the fiscal cliff. but europe is still a mess, i mean, governor, central bank governor mario sort of said let there be money and that
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)